in your-face feminism

A gang rape happened in Ohio and no one heard about it. A gang rape happened in India and everyone heard about it (as we should). The American media has represented India as a misogynistic country where women need to be constantly wary of the men that surround them. And after that gang rape, large-scale protests blocked the streets and clogged the media. Now, I am in no way saying that rape and domestic violence are not problems in India. As an Indian-American woman who has been to India many times and is incredibly familiar with the culture, I am in no way denying that. Rape, in India, is a serious problem. Rape, especially in lower class areas in India, is an extremely prevalent problem that needs to stop being ignored and taken seriously. Violence against women in India is a serious issue.

But violence against women in America is also a serious problem. Violence against women in South Africa, and Sweden, and Chile, and Thailand, is a serious problem. Violence against women is a serious problem. Period. Full stop. While our media went out representing India as a typical place for these deplorable events to happen, another woman’s similar story went ignored and without subsequent societal action. This country outright refuses to admit that it is a rape culture.

Our media and our country are so obsessed with presenting foreign countries as worse than us or uncivilized or, most importantly, undemocratic, they will blast our radios and timelines and homepages with news of rapes in India, but refuse to acknowledge that the same thing happens here and is happening here.

— Anisha Ahuja, Why Does America Pretend it Doesn’t Hate Women? (Feminspire.com)


International Women's Day: New challenges ahead →

Newspaper coverage of the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire around which the first International Women’s Day was organized.

"All this said, the incredible pluralism of choice that challenges the glass ceilings remains possible for a precious few. For too many people, especially the poor across the globe, white privilege and misogynist hierarchy remain in place. 

The invisibility of misogyny and its patriarchal global and national structures seem to be uncovered more readily now. Maybe, just maybe, we are in a new moment of possibility - where the visibility is seen, and shared, and challenged by billions of women rising together, against sexual violence, for economic justice, and saving the planet.”


It Did Not Start With Stonewall

Our revolution didn’t start with Stonewall. African-American lesbian elders tell the tales of gay New York life in Harlem, Brooklyn and the Bronx before the world-altering Stonewall rebellion. In this clip they recall, raids and suffocating laws and racial discrimination faced within the gay community.


"We want to save you! And if you dont appreciate it you will be punished!"

Interview with Pye Jacbsson, a sex worker activist from Sweden - an HCLU-SWAN film.


Dude Magazine #1 →

DUDE #1 – is the original DUDE. 45 pages of accessible educational reading, photography and comics. This is a trans male 101 reference guide and it is a very helpful tool to give to people so you don’t have to answer too many personal questions.

DUDE is a collection of queer and trans perspectives on various topics related to trans guys.

DUDE is a not for profit creative resource designed to celebrate positive representation of trans guys and to share skills and knowledge within our wider community.

DUDE magazine explores sex, relationships, bodies and diversity between transguys and the wider community. Our specific goal is to facilitate smoother, less awkward interactions between transguys and other people; particularly so we can all enjoy hotter, safer sex in more places, more often, with more people!

Sex represents an intersection of bodies, gender, identity and desire which intrigues us, not just because sex for transguys is underrepresented, but because erotic encounters can be seen as extreme and explicit examples of general interactions we experience every day – with a potential and capacity for awkwardness, intimacy, confrontation, education, adoration.

DUDE recognizes and relishes that masculinity is nebulous, and that our relationships to it can be divergent, contradictory and ambiguous. 

Gray Panthers Chicago: TIFfed Off!       Published on Sep 10, 2012

Gray Panthers recently joined teachers, students, hotel workers, union members, and neighbors in a spirited rally in Chicago’s Hyde Park. We were thrilled to find that folks we’d just met were happy to carry our signs. 

But what brought us all together wasn’t joy — it was outrage.

We’re outraged that our property taxes are being used to fund the construction of a luxury hotel — while our public schools face millions of dollars in cuts. Taking money from school kids and giving it to billionaire hotel developers — that’s what has us TIFfed off.

See, a TIF- Tax Increment Financing — is a slush fund that lets the mayor do pretty much what he wants. And what Major Rahm Emanuel wants apparently it isn’t better neighborhood schools.

We’re taking on the mayor and TIF financing because Gray Panthers are age and youth in action. Our fight is your fight: social and economic justice for everyone.

So join us. You don’t have to be gray. Gray Panthers come in all colors and all ages. If you’re tiffed off — about slush funds, education, privatization, health care — any kind of injustice — you’re one of us. Visit http://GrayPanthers.org


Atlachinocolotl: My Life as a Performer

From Spanish drag to baile folklorico to Danza Azteca


[Acclaimed queer theorist and feminist] Judith Butler follows Edward Said’s late suggestion that through a consideration of Palestinian dispossession in relation to Jewish diasporic traditions a new ethos can be forged for a one-state solution. 
Butler engages Jewish philosophical positions to articulate a critique of political Zionism and its practices of illegitimate state violence, nationalism, and state-sponsored racism…. Butler engages thinkers such as Edward Said, Emmanuel Levinas, Hannah Arendt, Primo Levi, Martin Buber, Walter Benjamin, and Mahmoud Darwish as she articulates a new political ethic.

[Acclaimed queer theorist and feminist] Judith Butler follows Edward Said’s late suggestion that through a consideration of Palestinian dispossession in relation to Jewish diasporic traditions a new ethos can be forged for a one-state solution.

Butler engages Jewish philosophical positions to articulate a critique of political Zionism and its practices of illegitimate state violence, nationalism, and state-sponsored racism…. Butler engages thinkers such as Edward Said, Emmanuel Levinas, Hannah Arendt, Primo Levi, Martin Buber, Walter Benjamin, and Mahmoud Darwish as she articulates a new political ethic.


Toward Transformative Justice: A Liberatory Approach to Child Sexual Abuse and other forms of Intimate and Community Violence →

Generation FIVE’s vision is to end the sexual abuse of children within five generations. Generation FIVE approaches all of its work within a Transformative Justice framework.

Transformative Justice is a response to the State’s inability to provide justice on either individual or collective levels. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a model that responds to experiences of violence without relying on current State systems. We believe this to be a liberating politic that creates opportunities for healing and transformation rather than retribution and punishment. Transformative Justice moves us toward equity and liberation rather than maintaining the inequality that the current State and systems maintain.